Tag Archives: ImageJ

Staying in (version) control

As part of my job, I find myself writing lots of bits of code for people. Until quite recently, my version control system was renaming the files and commenting in the header to keep track of changes.

Not the tidiest system

I say “quite recently” as I started using git as my version control system and have not looked back. I’m by no means an expert, but in this post, I’m going to give an introduction to using git in the context of scripting.

This post is really aimed at people who have no experience with version control systems or have heard about git but have never really used it (or have tried and failed to get the hang of it as I did…twice).

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Waving Your Wand

Often, image analysis involves the measurement of objects, be they nuclei, cells or bacteria. There are plenty of good ways to select the boundaries of these objects, using freehand or segmented selections, and we’ve covered segmentation based on thresholding before.

This post is going to take a step back and look at how the magic wand tool works. It’s quick and simple, but sometimes that’s all you need. Let’s wave our wands!

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Making it up (Part 1)

Whenever you’re testing a new analysis protocol or playing around with some software, it’s always handy to have some sample data to mess with. But what if you don’t yet have the data, or what if you need more, or need more specific data? In this post, we’re going to delve into the world of synthetic data by making a sample tracking data set.

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Staying On Track

In the toolbox of the image analyst, being able to correlate objects in time is a very useful skill. It opens up the doors to be able to look at dynamic changes in a system be they intensity, shape, spatial localisation or just about anything else. In this post, we’ll be covering the basic theory of object tracking and showing you how to track with open source tools.

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